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Latest news:

October 28, 2008:
WebQuest 101. A series of short introductory videos has been developed by SDSU Professor T. J. Kopcha. You'll find them here.

October 22, 2008:
WebQuests and Web 2.0? This webinar conducted by the Discovery Education Network features a discussion about how blogs and wikis fit into the WebQuest model. You can view the archive here.

August 9, 2007:
QuestGarden received the MERLOT Teacher Education Classics Award at the organization's international conference in New Orleans.

Contact

Please report bad links and suggest additions and improvements to the site by writing to
Bernie Dodge, PhD.

Minds We Like

Annette Lamb

Jamie McKenzie

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David Warlick

Elliot Aronson

Dan McDowell


About SDSU

WebQuests originated at the San Diego State University Department of Educational Technology. Information is available about our Masters and Distance Programs as well as COMET, the new online Masters Program specifically designed for California teachers

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Welcome

You've arrived at the most complete and current source of information about the WebQuest Model. Whether you're an education student new to the topic or an experienced teacher educator looking for materials, you'll find something here to meet your needs.

Announcing:
The WebQuest Research Consortium

statisticsAre you a doctoral student or faculty member interested in conducting research on WebQuests? You're invited to join a new informal group to exchange ideas, collaborate and co-author. We can capture data as QuestGarden users create their own WebQuests that open up interesting lines of inquiry about the planning process teachers use. Write bdodge@mail.sdsu.edu to learn more.

What is a WebQuest?

A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web. The model was developed by Bernie Dodge at San Diego State University in February, 1995 with early input from SDSU/Pacific Bell Fellow Tom March, the Educational Technology staff at San Diego Unified School District, and waves of participants each summer at the Teach the Teachers Consortium.

Since those beginning days, tens of thousands of teachers have embraced WebQuests as a way to make good use of the internet while engaging their students in the kinds of thinking that the 21st century requires. The model has spread around the world, with special enthusiasm in Brazil, Spain, China, Australia and Holland.

To find out more, explore the links to the left of this page.